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Build Version and Pricing
  • Hi All

      I have been weighing up several gaming engines for making games and I have narrowed it down to GameBuilder Studio and another . I just wanted to ask some questions on GameBuilder . Firstly when using the Free Version I noticed that it is in Beta . Does this also apply for the PRO version ?

     My other query is that I noticed the price is currently at $99.99 for a limited time, do we know how long this offer is on for as at the moment I need to work on the Free version to see if I can get my head around how it all works before I make any decisions or commintments .

     Also I know the software is called GameBuilder but can it be used to make Apps for the mobile market ?

    Thanks

    TimCS
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  • Hi Again

    Sorry to add a comment to my post but I cannot seem to find a way of editing it. My other query is when publishing the game to the Android platform , does game builder studio create a native apk ? I  know that some programs create either a HTML5 file for Android or I think even a flash file.

    Thanks

    TimCS
  • @TCS

     The pro version right now is in beta as well, however it is very stable.

    I don't know how long it will be at that price, but that price is for unlimited builds no monthly fees or anything else just a one time 99.99 payment. Where other game engines I found like this are 299 per yr. or they are free but charge you per build. 

    If you play around with some of the tutorials you'll see if its rather straight forward.

    Even though it is called game builders studio. I use it to make educational apps. I don't think you'll be able to tap into full native support while using game builder studio, but you can do so many different animations and make games for android iOS and other systems really fast and easily.

    When publishing for android it does create a native .apk. However I believe it is an adobe action script that it is really referencing, so maybe flash...not sure. With that native .apk you can publish  without any problems on google play, amazon app store, slideme, etc. 

    Hope this helps


  • @Carlton
      
       Thanks for your reply on this matter, I wondered about the native aspect of the Android build. Do you find the games/app run well on the mobile devices as some of these game engines apparently have performance issues because their method when the api is built, causes performance problems. I also wondered if Game Builder Studio needed the Android SDK in order to build the game/app.

     Also do you find the file size to be resonable for the games/apps you have built ?

     I agree on the price of this game engine to be far more reasonable in cost than those others I have looked into . Like you have stated on some there is just a yearly fee and this can be very off putting. 

     On the tutorials front, I have looked at these and some of the methods are starting to make sense its just that I have been going through quite a few game engines to try them out and because they all work differently it is just understanding how Game Builder Studio works.

     On a basic matter I am trying find a way of creating a Quit button but so far all attempts have failed. Is this possible? Obviously I can create the button and even on capture but I do not know what trigger I need to use.

    Thanks

    TimCS  
  • @TCS

    The android SDK is already built into the game once it is compiled, The only issue I have encounted early on was that I had one game that had 50 plus mp3s and while it worked on the pc testing it out. It had a slow load time on android and wouldn't even run on IOS, but I just recently made sight words game and that has 200 plus mp3s and I didn't encounter any issues on either OS.

    The file size for a basic game stays around 16mbs for me, I have some games that are rich in graphics and they run around 30-40mb.

    I tried out stencil at first, but it didn't seem as straight forward as GBS. Also the pricing and the tutorials left something to be desired.

    I would set some time aside and run through the Hungry Hero Tutorial, or just some of those sample examples on the first page when GBS starts up. I think its best to start real simple and see whats possible.

    You could build your games in GBS and test them out in the flash player and see how they turn out. If you like the way it turns out then you could just go pro and release to all the other OS's fairly easily.

    I've seen a question about the quit button before. But speaking as a semi UI developer, why would you need a quit button? When's the last time you opened up an app and there was a quit button. The desktop versions will be in some kind of window. You could add an event for GBS on System.Deactivation to just stop all sound and movement on the screen(like the pause tutorial on Hungry Hero). There might be a way to do it through flash builder but I'm not sure how.

    Hope this helps
  • @Carlton

       Thank you again for your informative reply. I presume when you say that the Android SDK is built into the game,does this mean just the API level selected or the entire SDK?

     Also, would you say that 16mb the right kind of size for the games you have done ? I have tried out unity and without even adding any particular action to my project other that a sphere and a plane object I find this to be already 8mb in size even before any coding went into it. 

     This was the main reason why I moved away from this gaming engine in a effort to find one that the game sizes would not be this large. If 16mb contains a fair amount of sound and graphics then I think this would be okay.

    I have started going through the hungry hero tutorial already and from watching this so far it has made more sense to me on how games can be made in GBS. 

     Stencil seemed expensive to me also and the other one construct 2 I found that it built the games for the mobile platform using HTML5 and users had stated that this made the games run slow.

     My reason for asking on the quit button is that on Android I have made apps through the SDK (mainly for my own use) and on press the back button or home key to come out of the apps, Android OS seems to keep them running in the background, which to me can put a little strain on the battery. This is why when I did my own apps I always made sure that the app could be ended via a quit option and that the app would close completely. 

    Thanks

    TimCS

  • In GBS you don't select an API, I believe it is preset, however you can override it when compiling to use the latest android API if you require it. (It's a simple browse button and you select the api you want).

    Out of the last 5 games I have made 16mb seems about right for a general game with generic graphics and code. 

    I don't know if your on mac or not, but TexturePacker is an awesome resource that allows you to make spritesheets. It's well worth the 40 bucks. You can make games without, but I found that it helped reduce loading significantly. 

    I used to make a lot of apps using GPS, SMS etc. However I don't believe with you'll be straining your phones battery with some of the games and apps you can make with GBS. But if you are concerned with that you could just create some kind of event that listens for system deactivation and stop everyting going on in the app.  Then add another event for System reactivation and just start every up again.

    At first that was a little confusing for me so I just made a system deactivation go back to the initial index of my app where I didn't have any sound or movement. 

    Most of the issues that you run into with GBS, can be worked around, and if you find anything not working the way its suppose to just leave a note on the forum and it usually gets resolved rather fast.


  • @Carlton

      Thanks once again Carlton for your reply it has been very useful. The only other game engine I was looking at was the ClickTeam Multimedia Fusion 2 but I feel it is a bit steep in what they are asking for it. It starts out at £69.99 (Pounds Sterling, UK based here) and then to deploy to android is another £69.99 so it basically is double the cost of GBS. The other off put is that it is Windows based only. I prefer using my MacBook over the Windows Laptop that I have and furthermore would prefer a game engine like GBS that works on both.

     So with the Android API does it then include all versions in the build if not selected? So you can select an API if needed? 

     Regarding TexturePacker I got the free version at the moment so what is the difference between the free and the one you pay for ?

     I am not sure of how the System deactivate works at the moment so I will have to look into that one, thanks for the pointer on this though.

    Sorry for more questions Carlton and I do appreciate your input here, I just want to get it clear in my head what is what :)

    Thanks

    TimCS

  • For the android API it includes all versions, but you can select an specific API if needed. All GBS builds that I've tested work on a minimum 2.3 android OS, that takes care of 98% of devices right there.

    I started working on some games that required a lot of images and with the free version you can't throw all your images in TP and process it with the free version.

    I would start with a square, add it to the screen. (learn how gravity works)

    Then add an rule to the square, so it plays sound or spins after a click.

    Then add another rule for system deactivation, and when activated the square stops spinning or changes a color.

    You'll get it.

    Right now I'm helping my 7 year old make an app, I had a lot of questions when I started too so I'm just returning the advice that I got.
  • @Carlton

       Once again thanks for your input on this all. Noted with TP and the limits on the free version. 

      I will try out what you have suggested here on starting with something basic. I was going through the Hungry Hero tutorial but I think starting simple is best first. 

    Good luck with teaching your son you never know he might make that "successful app/game" :) 

    Thanks

    TimCS

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